The Integrative Action of the Nervous System

£20.00

Author: Charles Scott Sherrington
Pages: 348
ISBN: 978-1-909052-57-4
Language: English

Description

“. . . .the correction and upbuilding of the circulation is the essential foundation
on which to correct nervous co-ordination and the nervous and mental diseases.” 

Dr. J. M. Littlejohn

Lectures on the Fundamentals of Osteopathic Technique

CONTENTS

  • Lecture I–INTRODUCTORY–CO-ORDINATION OF THE SIMPLE REFLEX
    The Simple Reflex
    Co-ordination in the Simple Reflex
    Reflex Latency
    Reflex After–Discharge
  • Lecture II–CO–ORDINATION IN THE SIMPLE REFLEX (continued)
    Summation
    Irreversibility of Direction of Conduction
    Rhythm of Response
    Refractory Phase
  • Lecture III–CO–ORDINATION IN THE SIMPLE REFLEX (Concluded)
    Grading of Intensity
    Reflex Conduction less Resistant than Nerve Conduction
    Functions of the Perikaryon
    Reciprocal Inhibition
  • Lecture IV–INTERACTION BETWEEN REFLEXES
    Allied Reflexes
    Reflex Complication
    Proprio–Ceptive Reflexes
    Alliance of Proprio‑Ceptive with Extero‑Ceptive Reflexex
    Wider Combinations of Reflexes
    Allied Inhibitory Reflexes
    Antagonistic Reflexes
    Partial Interference
    Number of Common Paths
    Mutual Indifference Between Reflexes
  • Lecture V–COMPOUND REFLEXES: SIMULTANEOUS COMBINATION
    Irradiation
    Neurone–Threshold
    Short and Long Reflexes
    Rules Observed in the Spread of Impulses in Spinal Reflexes
    The Reflex Figure
    The Collection of Fibres in a Motor Spinal Root does not Represent
    a “Reflex Figure”
    The Receptive Field of a Reflex does not Conform with the
    Field of Distribution of an Afferent Spinal Root
    Reinforcement
  • Lecture VI–COMPOUND REFLEXES: SUCCESSIVE COMBINATION
    Inhibition
    Interference
    Factors Determining the Sequence
    I.  Spinal Induction
    II.  Fatigue
    III.   Intensity
    IV.  Species of Reflex
  • Lecture VII–REFLEXES AS ADAPTED REACTIONS
    Spinal Shock
    Local Sign in Reflexes
    Pseudaffective Reflexes
    Bodily Resonance of Emotions
  • Lecture VIII–SOME ASPECTS OF THE REACTIONS
    OF THE MOTOR CORTEX
  • Lecture IX–THE PHYSIOLOGICAL POSITION AND DOMINANCE
    OF THE BRAIN
    The Primitive Reflex–Arc
    The Diffuse Nervous System, the Grey-Centred Nervous System
    The Central Nervous System a Part of the Latter
    Integrative Action of the Nervous System in the Segment and in the Segmental Series
    The Receptive Fields
    Richness of the Extero–Ceptive Field in Receptors; Comparative Poverty
    of the Intero–Ceptive
    Nervous Integration of the Segment
    Special Refinements of the Receptors of the ‘Leading’ Segments
    The Refined Receptors of the Leading Segments are ‘Distance‑Receptors.
    The After-Coming Segments Form a Motor Train
    Actuated Chiefly by the ‘Distance-Receptors’
    Extensive Internuncial Paths of ‘Distance-Receptors’
    Precurrent Reactions.  Consummatory Reactions
    Strong Affective Tone an Accompaniment of Consummatory Reactions
    Receptive Range
    Locomotion and ‘Receptive Range’
    The ‘Head’ as Physiologically Conceived
    The Proprio–Ceptive System and the Head
    Nervous Integration of a Segmental Series
    Restriction of Segmental Distribution a Factor in Integration
    The Cerebellum is the Head Ganglion of the Proprio-Ceptive System
    The Cerebrum is the Ganglion of the ‘Distance-Receptors’
    Lecture X–SENSUAL FUSION
    A.  Symmetrical Flicker
    B.  Asymmetrical Flicker
    Uniocular and Binocular Comparisons

Additional information

Weight1200 g
Dimensions210 x 148 x 30 mm